Easy Introduction to Multiple Intelligence Theory

Easy Introduction to Multiple Intelligence Theory

 

Exploration and Application of Multiple Intelligence Functionality:

Dr. Howard Gardner, Professor of Education at Harvard University, developed the Theory of Multiple Intelligences in 1983. We agree with Dr. Gardner, that nurturing the eight different intelligences in each of our children, will account for a broader range of potential. It also brings awareness to the teachers that learning styles vary amongst the children, which then affect their lesson planning and classroom environment.

  • Linguistic intelligence (“word smart”) our teachers address the basic language skills of phonological awareness, vocabulary and comprehension using interactive storytelling, research based phonics programs, and more without the tedium of “drill and kill” memorization or worksheets.
  • Logical-mathematical intelligence (“number/reasoning smart”) Through a multisensory teaching experience our children learn to understand classification, comparative thinking, number recognition, addition, subtraction, concepts of units of time, length and capacity, sorting, patterns, geometry, graphing and problem solving.
  • Spatial intelligence (“picture smart”) Through explorations, investigations and discussion of shapes and structures in the classroom, our children become more proficient in describing, representing and navigating their environment. These are all tools necessary for children who will one day grow up to become architects, engineers, scientists, cartographers or even artists.
  • Bodily-Kinesthetic intelligence (“body smart”) Our children love to be on the move and this is one of the reasons we believe in learning by doing. Throughout each day, our children are involved in activities that involve gross-motor and fine-motor abilities. Through our use of manipulatives, story telling dramatization, thematic centers, interactive science, and our indoor and outdoor play areas, your child will nurture his high kinesthetic abilities and intelligence throughout each day.
  • Musical intelligence (“music smart”) It’s no secret that music and intelligence go hand in hand. Throughout the day, our children listen to all genres of music while they are busy exploring and resting. In addition, our Musikgraten program promotes patterns, pitch, rhythms, repetition and focus which are all skills needed in other domains such as language and mathematics.
  • Interpersonal intelligence (“people smart”) Social development is a critical component of our day. By age four, our children can play well together, have a rich imaginative play and the higher mental abilities that were starting to bud in the previous years, can be set to work. Our teachers encourage participation in group activities, responsibility to be good citizens in the classroom and out in the world, teach manners, meeting and greeting formalities, and awareness and appreciating differences and similarities of each other.
  • Intrapersonal intelligence (“self smart”) Children can only learn when they feel loved. Emotion is the proverbial on-off switch for learning. Throughout each day, we provide interesting learning opportunities to nurture this intelligence. The children participate in activities such as journal writing.